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  • The Arnold Pfeffer Center for Neuropsychoanalysis

    A Dyad before Birth: Psychobiological Pathways of Influence & for Intervention

    Saturday, April 2, 2016
    10:00 AM

    "A Dyad before Birth: Psychobiological Pathways of Influence & for Intervention" with Dr. Catherine Monk

    The burgeoning research field known variously as the fetal origins of adult disease (FOAD), or the developmental origins of health and disease (DOHAD), demonstrates that maternal distress during pregnancy affects fetal and infant brain–behavior development. This is a ‘third pathway’ for the familial inheritance of psychiatric illness beyond shared genes and the quality of parental care, and one that, if fully understood, could lead to early prevention of developmental risk. Moreover, it is increasingly accepted that there are bi–directional influences between mother and fetus, mother and infant, which can be accessed in preventative treatments for the benefit of each member of the dyad.

    In this lecture, Dr. Monk will describe her lab’s FOAD studies that focus on women in the perinatal period and fetal and infant neurobehavioral developmental including direct studies of the fetus, newborn brain imaging, and placental methylation. She also will review her lab’s intervention for perinatal depression that works through the close dyadic interaction of the mother and child.

    2 CME/CE credits offered

    RSVP is appreciated but not necessary; first come, first-seated FREE. All are welcome.

    New York Psychoanalytic Society & Institute
    247 East 82nd Street (between 2nd and 3rd Avenues)
    The Marianne & Nicholas Young Auditorium


    Dr. Catherine Monk holds a joint appointment as an Associate Professor in the Departments of Psychiatry, and Obstetrics & Gynecology, Columbia University Medical Center. Reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of her research, she is affiliated with two divisions in Psychiatry: Behavioral Medicine and Developmental Neuroscience. She is Director for Research at the Women’s Program, as well as Co–Director of the Sackler Parent–Infant Project and of the Domestic Violence Initiative. After completing her NIH post–doctoral fellowship in the Psychobiological Sciences at Columbia in 2000, Dr. Monk joined the faculty and established the Perinatal Pathways Laboratory.

guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •
guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •
guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •