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  • The Helix Center for Interdisciplinary Investigation

    Why Do Economists Disagree?

    Saturday, October 13, 2012
    2:30 PM

    The Helix Center for Interdisciplinary Investigation @ NYPSI is pleased to present a group of politically diverse, noted economists exploring their philosophical divergences, and convergences, around the question "Why Do Economists Disagree?"

    Robert Frank, Cornell University, moderates a roundtable discussion which is sure to be of interest to every voter just days before Election Day. Participants include Graciela Chichilnisky, Columbia University; Jeffrey Miron, Harvard University; Joseph T. Salerno, Pace University.

    Donations Accepted

    New York Psychoanalytic Society & Institute
    247 East 82nd Street (between 2nd and 3rd Avenues)
    The Marianne & Nicholas Young Auditorium


    Graciela Chichilnisky is currently Professor of Economics at Columbia University. She has worked extensively in the Kyoto Protocol process, creating and designing the carbon market that has become international law in 2005. She is currently the co-founder and CEO of Global Thermostat, a company that has developed and is commercializing a unique technology for the direct capture of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and other sources. Chichilnisky is the author of fifteen books and over 250 scientific articles published in the preeminent academic journals covering economics, finance and mathematics.

    Robert H. Frank is currently the Henrietta Johnson Louis Professor of Management, Professor of Economics at Cornell University. He is also a monthly contributor to the "Economic Scene" column in The New York Times. Frank's books include Choosing the Right Pond, Passions within Reason, Microeconomics and Behavior, Luxury Fever, and What Price the Moral High Ground? The Winner-Take-All Society, co-authored with Philip Cook, was named a Notable Book of the Year by The New York Times, and was included in BusinessWeek’s list of the ten best books for 1995.

    Jeffrey Miron is currently a Senior Lecturer and Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Economics at Harvard University, as well as a senior fellow at the Cato Institute. His field of expertise is the economics of libertarianism. He has advocated for many libertarian policies, including legalizing all drugs and allowing failing banks to go bankrupt. He has written four books including Drug War Crimes: The Consequences of Prohibition and Libertarianism, from A to Z.

    Joseph T. Salerno is currently Professor of Economics in the Lubin School of Business at Pace University. He is the editor of the Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics; Academic Vice President of the Ludwig von Mises Institute; research associate for the Foundations of the Market Economy in the economics department at New York University; and a policy expert for the Heritage Foundation in Washington, D.C. Dr. Salerno has published numerous essays and articles in scholarly books and popular and academic journals. He has authored or co-authored three books and edited several others. His most recent book, Money: Sound and Unsound, was published in 2010.

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guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •
guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •