past events & lectures

  • 2016
  • 2015
  • 2014
  • 2013
  • 2012
  • 2011
  • Scientific Meeting sponsored by the Child Analysis Committee

    The Creation and Evolution of a Hostile Introject over 50 Years

    Tuesday, March 31, 2015
    8:00 PM

    In honor of the 70th Anniversary of The Psychoanalytic Study of the Child

    "The Creation and Evolution of a Hostile Introject over 50 Years"
    with Wendy Olesker, Ph.D.

    Discussants: Miriam Steele, Ph.D. and Inga Blom, Ph.D.

    Josephine Wright, M.D. will speak about the importance of The Psychoanalytic Study of the Child and introduce the speakers.

    This Scientific Meeting will honor the 70th anniversary of The Psychoanalytic Study of the Child. Josephine Wright, MD will highlight some of the most important papers of the PSC, including some of the contributions by members of NYPSI and then introduce the other speakers. Dr. Wendy Olesker will then present a paper entitled "The Creation and Developmental Evolution of a Hostile Introject over 50 Years" addressing the impact of early aggression on mental representations and memories over the course of a life. Dr. Olesker will present developmental and clinical material including observations from the Mahler nursery, material from latency, early and late adolescence, and adulthood, including the Adult Attachment Interview.

    FREE. ALL ARE WELCOME.

    New York Psychoanalytic Society & Institute
    247 East 82nd Street (between 2nd and 3rd Avenues)
    The Marianne & Nicholas Young Auditorium


    Wendy Olesker is a Training and Supervising Analyst at the New York Psychoanalytic Society & Institute and on the Faculty of the NYU Postdoctoral Program in Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy. She is on the Editorial Board of The Psychoanalytic Study of the Child and The International Journal of Psychoanalysis. Presently she is Director of the Postdoctoral Fellowship Program at the New York Psychoanalytic Institute. In 1975 until 1986 she established and ran, at Montefiore Medical Center, an observational nursery for research on gender differences in early development. From 1991 until 1997 she collaborated with John McDevitt and Anni Bergman in following up with the original Mahler/McDevitt babies of the Separation-Individuation Study. It is from her longitudinal research and her analytic experience that she has developed a focus on the developmental process as it impacts understanding and handling aggression in young children.

    Inga Blom is a supervising staff psychologist at Lenox Hill Hospital and in private practice in NYC. She is also adjunct professor in Child Assessment at the New School for Social Research, where she completed her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology and was a member of the Center for Attachment Research. Her dissertation, under the mentorship of Miriam Steele and Anni Bergman, evolved around reevaluating the original data from the Masters Children's Center, and interviewing the original participants as adults using the Adult Attachment Interview and other instruments. That research has contributed to a yearly discussion group at the American Psychoanalytic Association National Meetings and numerous publications. She is currently on the board of the Margaret S. Mahler Child Development Foundation. She is a former candidate in psychoanalysis at NYPSI.

    Miriam Steele is Professor and Director of Clinical Training in Psychology at the New School for Social Research. She bridges the world of psychoanalytic thinking and clinical practice with contemporary research in child development. She trained as a child analyst at the Anna Freud Centre London and received her Ph.D. from University College London. Her research began with the study of “Intergenerational Patterns of Attachment” which embodied one of the first prospective longitudinal studies incorporating the Adult Attachment Interview and Strange Situation protocols. This work was important in initiating the concept of reflective functioning and providing empirical data to demonstrate the importance of parental states of mind in the social and emotional development of the their children with a longitudinal focus on their development into adulthood. Currently, Dr. Steele is a co-investigator on a federally funded grant “Birth to Three: A Pragmatic Clinical Trial for Child Maltreatment Prevention. Her other projects include studies exploring attachment and body representations in mother-child dyads, and studies of child development in families utilizing assisted reproductive technologies.

    Josephine Wright is a practicing Adult and Child and Adolescent psychiatrist and psychoanalyst, who is on the teaching Faculty of both the New York Psychoanalytic Institute and the Berkshire Psychoanalytic Institute. She has published papers in several psychoanalytic journals focused on her interests in adoption, developmental problems and issues of character, as well as a book for parents about ADHD.

guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •
guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •
guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •