past events & lectures

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  • 2013
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  • 2011
  • "Dialogues on..." Child and Adolescent Psychoanalysis

    Why is it easier to get mad than to feel sad?

    Wednesday, November 20, 2013
    8:00 PM

    "Why is it easier to get mad than to feel sad?"
    with Leon Hoffman, M.D.

    Children who exhibit frequent temper tantrums, who argue excessively with adults, or have other behavioral problems can be very frustrating for parents, caretakers, and teachers. The challenge is how to set appropriate limits to prevent harm while at the same time communicating with the child that there is a reason for the problematic behavior: that it might be easier for the child to be mad than to feel sad. The challenges and some approaches will be discussed.

    Note: For free events, reservations can only be held until 10 minutes prior to the program start time.

    New York Psychoanalytic Society & Institute
    247 East 82nd Street (between 2nd and 3rd Avenues)
    The Marianne & Nicholas Young Auditorium


    LEON HOFFMAN, M.D. is Director of The Pacella Parent Child Center at New York Psychoanalytic Society & Institute and also works with parents and children in private practice. Dr. Hoffman has written widely for professional and general audiences on common parenting and child rearing issues and is frequently a quoted expert during media interviews, including most recently, Bloomberg Radio. His additional roles at NYPSI include Training and Supervising Analyst in child, adolescent, and adult psychoanalysis as well as co-Director of NYPSI’s Research Center. Dr. Hoffman continue to serve as Chief Psychiatrist for West End Day School in Manhattan and is on the Faculty of Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •
guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •
guidance • support • stress • anxiety • depression • conflict • hyperactivity • identity disorders • socialization • self-esteem •